The Delta Statement

#MeToo

The Movement Against Sexual Assault

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#MeToo

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In recent weeks, it seems that more and more women are standing up to the men who have sexually assaulted them.

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, an average of 21 percent of female undergraduates reported that they had been sexually assaulted since school started. This study was just from nine unnamed universities and colleges in the U.S. With these crimes being done in the dark finally being brought to the light, a movement has started around the country.

Sexual assault victims have always felt powerless and looked at their attacks as something to keep quiet, but now, women have a voice that allows them to break through the silence. The “Me Too” movement began over 10 years ago by Tarana Burke when she wore a shirt that stated “Me Too.” She has the goal of ending America’s rape society, and she hopes to bring a positive and powerful light to these dark events.

In the last few years, the movement has spread like wildfire. In recent weeks, the message off of Burke’s shirt became a popular hashtag. #MeToo became a popular way for people throughout the cyber world to share with their friends that they were or are suffering from sexual abuse or harassment. It is creating a very forceful bond between these women, and it shows them that they are not alone.

After interviewing serval women on the DSU campus, I found that all of them knew about the #MeToo movement, and many of them even posted this as their status on social media. One DSU student even stated, “I think the movement is a very big step for our country. Women are finally able to stand up for themselves and know their worth.”

There are measures that can be taken to help students or anyone at DSU to report sexual misconduct. If you aren’t safe, call 911 or call someone who you trust to come get you from your location.

If you live on campus or are on campus, you can call (662) 846-4155 to reach Campus Police. Also, you can contact the Title IX Coordinator at (662) 846-4143.

Another route you can take, if you’re comfortable enough, is to reach out to the DSU Campus Counseling Center, which is located in the O.W. Reily Health Center. The counseling center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. You can also contact them at (662) 846-4690.

For more information on how to report sexual assault and get help, go to http://www.deltastate.edu/student-life/sexual-assault-help/


 

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About the Writer
Jamie Martin, Social Media Editor

Jamie Martin is a junior English Education major from Silver Creek, Mississippi. Along with being a part of The Delta Statement, she serves as the Social...