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Should College Athletes Get Paid?

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Debate rages over whether college athletes should get paid for their hard physical and academic work. Another factor in the debate is that they make money for networks and companies such as the NCAA football video game, the best seller in 2014.

According to Austin Knoblauch, reporter for the LA Times, President Obama wants colleges to guarantee players’ scholarships and healthcare. Knoblauch states that Obama wants college athletes to be better taken care of because they are generating a lot of revenue.

Knoblauch also mentions that coaches and directors get paid millions of dollars and college athletes don’t get as much. However, Knoblauch asserts that, Obama is against college athletes getting paid but does recognize the struggle of being a college athlete.

Bradley Roby, a former Ohio State corner back, understands the struggle of not having enough as a college athlete. He says some athletes do not have enough money to take others out to eat or buy new shoes because they have no money to spare.

Also, Roby mentions how the NCAA generates over $123 million and spends over $122 million of that money each year. He wants to know what the NCAA does with millions of dollars, and why college athletes are not generating a penny of the money.

The federal court has expressed that college athletes should not be treated like employees but as students. It also mentioned that the NCAA had shifted gears on financial aid issues, expanding scholarships, and other personal costs.

However, Judge Wilken had a plan which would have paid some college athletes $5,000 a year.  Unfortunately, Wilken overturned the ruling because the NCAA was violating antitrust laws.

If it was not for the violating of the antitrust laws; the ruling would have never been overturned. The issue has been pushed to the side, but remains an important concern to college athletes and those who support them.

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